Biography of the Artist Sarah Lucas and Her Artwork

Custom Papers Help, Professional Academic Writing Services.

Biography of the Artist Sarah Lucas and Her Artwork

Sarah Lucas as a contemporary artist of the 21st century has used contemporary approaches in delineating the aspects of gender in society, as well as its representation in art.

Although feminist art history reveals that certain progress has been made regarding the objectification of the female body, art in the contemporary world is still created in a patriarchal society.

Aspects of patriarchy and the dominance of the male have to come up in contemporary artistic representations, as equilibrium is yet to be achieved in the construction of gender.

Works by Sarah Lucas

Works by Sarah Lucas such as in the self-portraits reveal an artist intent on challenging gender stereotypes and their representation in art. Lucas tries to bring a masculine image of herself in art as a way of construing the male gaze from the objectification of women.

More so, the artist tries to deconstruct the traditional concepts of representing art in an approach intended to view feminine art in a positive light. The titles of Lucas’ artworks use wordplay as she conforms to her image of tabloid feminism, and also as a way of directing attention to relevant art pieces that challenge existing notions of gender.

Some of her work may be regarded as aesthetic and not confrontational to gender stereotypes but her role in feminist art places her as an essential advocate of feminine subjectivity rather than objectification.

In order to enable women’s art to compete in fields from which female artists like herself had historically been barred, Lucas pushed the boundaries of her profession. She carried a particular grudge against what she perceived as the male-dominated contemporary art world.

She may thus be credited with being a key player in a change in perceptions of women’s art that occurred in the late 20th century and paved the way for the next generations of young female artists.

Lucas frequently uses visual puns to expose what she perceives as the ridiculousness of racial prejudices and trivial everyday occurrences. Her writing is renowned for its sarcastic humor and metaphoric attacks on gender stereotypes and the absurd language of the masculine working classes.

More Achievements

She refers to the model’s genital parts in her sculpture Two Fried Eggs and a Kebab (1992) by using slang terms: the breasts are “fried eggs,” and the vagina is a “kebab.” While a student at Goldsmith’s College, Lucas experimented with minimalist sculpture.

Later, she focused on more immediate visual sources, such as the British tabloid newspaper. She began the effort of combating the casual objectification of women and debunking the illusion of female sexual independence after being inspired by the feminist writer Andrea Dworkin.

She attacks restricted perceptions of female beauty in popular visual culture in her early self-portraits, such as Self Portrait with Fried Eggs (1996) and Eating a Banana (1990), which helped her become well-known.

Lucas’s beginning point is typically her direct access to resources, which might include everything from furniture to food to smoke to stockings and concrete blocks, despite the fact that she is known for her outspoken feminist views. However, the discovered items must be sculptural and associated.

The only real human face visible in her sculptures, which are all headless and only identifiable by their genitalia, is her own, which is pervasive thanks to a collection of photographic self-portraits.

Lucas’s beginning point is typically her direct access to resources, which might include everything from furniture to food to smoke to stockings and concrete blocks, despite the fact that she is known for her outspoken feminist views. However, the discovered items must be sculptural and associated.

The only real human face visible in her sculptures, which are all headless and only identifiable by their genitalia, is her own, which is pervasive thanks to a collection of photographic self-portraits.

Modern Art Implementation

One of the visible figures in modern art is Sarah Lucas, a member of the Young British Artists. As a key figure who emerged in the 1990s, Lucas has focused on provocative and subverted sculptors, as well as challenging the attitudes directed towards sexuality, gender, and the body.

Lucas’ use of familiar and abject materials to bring about provocative body forms brings about historical and contemporary connotations directed toward the body.

Artistic works by Lucas are less flattering in the representation of women and are suspended between representatives and authentic.

The fact that Lucas fails to comment on whether she is opposing the objectification of women or promoting it as an aesthetic raises the question of whether her works are aligned with the femininity movement or are the promotion of gender stereotypes.

Even as such questions linger, Lucas’ artworks bring about the issues of sexuality, class, national identity, and gender stereotypes.

Biography of Sarah Lucas

Lucas was born in 1962, the third of four children—two brothers and a sister. Her mother worked as a cleaner and a part-time gardener, while her father delivered milk. The Lucas family resided in North London close to Holloway Road in a council estate.

Lucas, a self-described tomboy, played around with neighborhood kids (mainly males), picking up swear words without fully comprehending what they meant. According to Lucas, her mother wouldn’t let her complete any homework since she believed that the time she spent in school should be sufficient for her education.

She said that she “bummed around for a couple of years” and subsisted on part-time jobs and unemployment benefits after leaving school at the age of 16 without any credentials.

After completing a foundation course at the London College of Printing in 1983, Lucas, who had previously attended the Working Men’s College in 1982, was given a spot in the program.

She attended Goldsmith College for her undergraduate studies in fine art from 1984 to 1987, where she made several friends who would go on to create the Young British Artists (YBA) movement, including Damien Hirst, Angus Fairhurst, Gillian Wearing, and Gary Hume.

Sadie Coles, an art director who at the time was employed at the Anthony d’Offay Gallery and would subsequently represent Lucas through her own business gallery in London, was introduced to Lucas in 1990.

Mature Period

In 1993, Lucas and colleague YBA Tracy Emin opened a temporary store (dubbed “The Shop”) at 103 Bethnal Green Road in London, drawing inspiration from Vivian Westwood and Michael McLaren’s Let it Rock store from the 1970s.

Lucas and Emin dubbed themselves “The Birds” and advertised their shop by passing out business cards at gatherings, despite the fact that their relationship turned out to be very fleeting.

The two also sold ashtrays with Damien Hirst’s face pasted on them, wire penises, hand-painted T-shirts with the inscriptions “Love Come” and “Fucking Useless,” and adorned key chains.

Late Period

Lucas doesn’t have a studio, doesn’t have an assistant, and likes to create from home with whatever materials are at hand. She is now in a position where she may work sporadically and at her own speed without feeling the need to meet deadlines since she has attained a certain degree of financial stability.

Lucas relocated to Suffolk and gave up reading newspapers and periodicals about the art world in an effort to escape the craziness of the urban art industry. Her “retreat” allowed her to keep in touch with friends and other creatives while concentrating on her job.

Legacy of Sarah Lucas

Although many in the art world view the rise of the YBAs as having both positive and negative effects—reprioritizing contemporary art as commerce, through works that frequently served as one-liners and jokes—their commercial success and that of their peers sent seismic waves through the entire industry that haven’t been matched.

When Lucas, Hirst, Tracey Emin, Gavin Turk, and other graduates from the late 1980s received their degrees, things like Tate Modern, the Frieze art festival, the proliferation of contemporary art galleries around the nation, and the enormous development of the UK art market were all unimaginable.

The largest collector of Lucas’s work, Damien Hirst, called her “the best artist I know” and said she was “out there stripped to the mast like Turner in the storm, doing amazing things over and over.” Hirst purchased all of Lucas’s early works from Charles Saatchi.

In fact, Lucas appears to have become stronger after her lauded solo exhibition at the Whitechapel Gallery in 2013 and her victorious pavilion showing at the 2015 Venice Biennale, whereas many of her YBA colleagues have seen a decline in their creative fortunes.

In summarizing Sarah’s current work, journalist Deborah Orr said: “It is clear that Sarah’s art has the very traits that people seek right now, post-crash, the most straightforward genuineness [and] raw skill for expression.”

Summary of Sarah Lucas

The Young British Artists (YBA) movement brought Lucas to the public’s notice as one of the leading contributors, joining the likes of Damien Hirst, Tracey Emin, and Gary Hume.

In order to appeal to the realms of commerce and fame in the late 1980s and early 1990s, the YBAs used shock tactics. Building her art out of commonplace items. For example, domestic furniture sometimes doubles as the human body.

Luisa brought raw energy to works that delivered blunt—some might even say obscene—commentaries on touchy subjects like sexuality, female objectification, and death.

The 2015 Venice Biennale was Lucas’ professional high point, where she displayed her frequently divisive piece I SCREAM DADDIO as the UK’s representative.

Disillusioned with the metropolitan art scene, she relocated to Suffolk’s more rural setting, where she now works from home, at her own speed, and with “her hands rather than her mind.”

This is a model Paper to get further assistance contact us at Custom Papers Help. Get academic writing from Custom Paper Help on “Biography of Sarah Lucas” at an affordable price.